Bashni

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Bashni is a interesting variant of checkers from Russia. The set up and movement is virtually the same as Shashki. However, what is different is what happens after a capture. Instead of a captured checker being removed from the board, it is placed under the checker or stack of checkers that captured it. This capturing mechanic makes for a very interesting game.

Bashni has been played since the mid 1800s . It almost faded into obscurity as it’s popularity waned. This was until it experienced a revival in the 1980s. Today you can find clubs and tournaments in Russia and the Ukraine. You can even find players playing on line.

Players 2

Equipment
8 x 8 checkerboard
12 dark checkers and 12 light checkers
How to play

• Checkers are set up on just the dark squares of the player’s first three rows.

• Checkers move forward on the diagonal one square.

• Checkers can capture forward or backward on the diagonal by hoping over the opponents checker and landing on the empty square behind it. If there is another checker that can be capture when it lands it continues to hop in the same direction. Captures are mandatory.

• When a checker is captured it is placed under the checker that captured it to form a stack. If it was captured by a stack of checkers it goes to the bottom of the stack.

• A stack moves and captures just like the checker or king that is on top.

• If a checker or stack captures an opponent’s stack only the top most checker of the stack is placed under capturing piece. The checker that was under the top most checker is now released and can be used by the owner on there next turn.

• When a checker or a ordinary checker on the top of a stack reaches the back row it immediately becomes a king. A king moves as many unblocked squares desired forward or backwards on the diagonal. When a king captures they hop the checker and can land on any empty square on a diagonal line behind the captured checkers. If there is a capture that can be made on the same move that a checker or stack becomes a king, it must be taken.

• A player wins when he or she capture all of the opponent’s checkers or block them so they can not move.

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Shashki and Shashki Poddavki

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Sashki is a popular form of checkers from Russia. In Shashki checkers move as in traditional checkers, but can capture forwards or backwards. Add flying kings and you have a very distinct game to play. But for some players that may not be enough. So,be sure to try Shashki Poddavki. It is played the same as Shashki except the object is to be the player who has all his or her checkers captured or blocked .

Players 2
Equipment
8X8 Checker board
12 white checkers and 12 dark checkers
How to play
Checkers are set up on just the dark squares of the player’s first three rows, as shown in the diagram below.

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Checkers move forward on the diagonal one square.

Checkers can capture forward or backward on the diagonal by hoping over the opponents checker and landing on the empty behind it. If there is another checker that can be capture when it lands it continues to hop. Captures are mandatory but the a player does not have to make the maximum captures as possible.

When a checker reaches the back row it becomes a king. A king moves as many unblocked squares as you wish forward or backwards on the diagonal. When a king captures they hop the checker and can land on any empty square on a diagonal line behind the captured checkers. If a checker is promoted and still has captures it can make it must continue capturing.

A player wins when they capture all the opponents’ checkers or block them so they can not move.
Variation
Shashki Poddavki
In Shashki Poddavki all the rules of Shashki are in effect. What is different is that the goal has changed. The winning player is the player who has all of his or her checkers captured or blocked so they can not move is the winner.

Improvised Dice Cup

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Dice cups are a great accessory when playing dice games. They reduce the sound of the rolling dice, conceal the dice from view in games like liars dice, and add some class a gravitas to a game.

With this in mind I started to test out some different object to see how good a improvised dice cup they would make. Paper cups, small card board boxes, plastic tumblers were all tried. The thing that worked best as a dice cup turned out to be the humble can cozy.

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Foam rubber sleeves for keeping cans cold make great dice cups. They are light weight and retain shape even after being crushed in a backpack. Rattling the dice inside it makes very little noise. They are also similar in size to manufactured dice cups. The only thing that is missing is a ridge to trip the dice as they exit the cup. If any readers have ideas on how to add a ridge please share it in the comments.